Safe to eat

All Australian red meat must be safe to eat

How do I make sure my livestock are safe to eat?

As an LPA-accredited producer you must carry out specific on-farm practices in order to produce safe red meat. These practices will ensure meat from your animals is free from residues and contaminants, and meets our customers’ expectations. 

How do I minimise the risk of contamination and/or disease on-farm?

By fulfilling the on-farm requirements of LPA you minimise the risk of contamination with residues or physical contaminants, and disease.  These requirements include:

  1. Property risk assessment
  2. Safe and responsible animal treatments
  3. Stock foods, fodder crops, grain and pasture treatments
  4. Preparation for dispatch of livestock
  5. Livestock transactions and movements
  6. Biosecurity
  7. Animal welfare

Ensuring animals are fully traceable also helps to manage the risk of spreading disease

What do I need to do to guarantee my livestock are free from contaminants?

Several on-farm practices can minimise contamination and assure buyers of the safety of the livestock they are purchasing. These include:

  1.     Property risk assessment
  2.     Safe and responsible animal treatments
  3.     Stock foods, fodder crops, grain and pasture treatments
How do I prove this to the customer?

Evidence that you are fulfilling all food safety requirements on-farm can be demonstrated in three primary ways. These are:

  1. Farm records – accurate, up to date records show you have considered all risks, and managed potential issues related to treatments and animal feed. LPA has templates available to assist you
  2. NLIS – ensure your animals are fully traceable by recording movements on and off your property
  3. LPA NVDs – declare the food safety status of livestock entering or leaving your property

Producers accredited under LPA are subject to on-farm audits including random and targeted audits to ensure they are complying with program requirements. They are also required to recommit to the program once every three years. This process includes an assessment of their knowledge of the program.

Can I be held accountable for the food safety of the livestock I produce?

An LPA NVD is a legal document. When you sign an LPA NVD, you are declaring the food safety status of the livestock listed on it.

As an accredited LPA producer you have made a commitment to fulfil LPA requirements on-farm, outlined in the LPA Rules and Standards.

Producers accredited under LPA are subject to random audits to ensure they are complying with program requirements.

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